Academic publishing

I received this comment on Unbounded Freedom from a friend of a friend. Had there been more time, I would have liked to have gone further into this issue:

‘I am not qualified to evaluate the non academic publishing side of things. At the risk of appearing biassed I think you could make a bit more of this area:
1. It is vast – 25,000 core journals.
2. Elsevier, the largest, publishes 1200 and has just produced a backfile of all 2000 that it has ever published. (Cost? In the region of £1 million). In a good year Elsevier makes £1 billion profit – up to 30% return on capital invested..
3. Prices have risen 2,3,4 times the rate of inflation for the last 20 years as commercial publishers carve out subject monopolies
4. The ‘price crisis’  is driving the Open Access movement. Academics write and publish without charge. Editors sometimes receive a modest fee.
Publishers then sell the product back to the library where the same
academics can then read the output of their colleagues. Publishers are
esssentially parasitic in the scholarly communication process.
5. Open Access is developing rapidly as funding bodies, (eg Wellcome and
some Research Councils), insist on articles based on research that they fund being placed in Institutional Repositories
6. Publishers are reacting by introducing ‘author pay’ models – as high as £3000 per article. This will shift their revenue streams from librarians to funding bodies.
7. It is quite possible that within 10 years there will be a decisive shift away from commercial publishing towards linked repositories combined with OA ‘not for profit’ journals.
It is all very messy but also fascinating!…’

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Uncategorized

4 Comments on “Academic publishing”


  1. The department of Electronics and Computer Science at Southampton University where I studied launched an OpenAccess repository in 2000. Currently it has over 10 thousand articles published by members of the department.

    During my years at university I seldom had to use journals, most information I needed was available on the Internet. Of course, engineers and computer scientists are more likely to publish their research online.

  2. Peter Suber Says:

    For a general introduction to open access for those who are new to the concept, see my Open Access Overview. For coverage of new developments, see my blog, Open Access News.

    Best,
    Peter

  3. Peter Suber Says:

    For a general introduction to open access for those who are new to the concept, see my Open Access Overview. For daily coverage of new developments, see my blog, Open Access News.

    Best,
    Peter

  4. Jackie Says:

    Thanks for your post, i am doing a study on this and you have gibven me some great info

    Greats

    Jackie

    Jack@seem.com


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: